Virtual Studio Visit - Typa, Print and Paper Centre, Estonia

Virtual Studio Visit - Typa, Print and Paper Centre, Estonia

Connecting Print Studios
A series of virtual visits to printmaking studios around the world

Typa, Print and Paper Centre, Estonia
Tuesday, 26 April 2022, 18:00 – 19:00 BST

FREE EVENT

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About the event

TYPA is a printing and paper arts centre, established in 2010 to save the last surviving letterpress machines and printing equipment from destruction. TYPA operates as a working museum, which, in addition to maintaining and exhibiting the collection, also hosts printing workshops and longer courses for students and professionals. Visitors can learn about papermaking, printing, letterpress and book-making.

This Virtual Visit is hosted by Charlotte Biszewski, TYPA's director and board member. Originally from Bristol, UK, she has been a printmaker and researcher of print history since 2013 when she began an MA at UWE's multidisciplinary printmaking program. Since then, she has lived in Poland and Estonia, completing a PhD in Digital and Experimental Print at Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Art and Design in Wrocław.

The event will last approximately one hour and will be an informal tour and talk. There will be time for Q&As at the end of the visit.

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Register your place:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/connecting-print-studios-typa-print-and-paper-arts-centre-tartu-estoni-tickets-319643661797

Visit Typa online:
https://typa.ee

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This event is organised by Northern Print and hosted by the Institute for Creative Arts Practice as part of: 'Connecting Young People with Print and with Print Studios across the World', which is a research & engagement collaboration managed in partnership between Northern Print, Newcastle University and Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums (TWAM). These events were inspired by the exhibition 'Print Goes Pop' at the Hatton Gallery; the latest in a series of Pop-Art themed exhibitions at the Hatton Gallery, which has strong links with the art movement of the 1950s and 60s.
With thanks to the Catherine Cookson Trust.
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